There will be more places to charge electric cars in the UK than there are petrol stations by 2020, according to new analysis by car maker Nissan.

More than 75% of UK petrol stations have closed in the last 40 years, whilst the number of electric vehicle charging locations has increased from a few hundred in 2011 to more than 4,100 locations in 2016.

At the end of 2015, there were 8,472 fuel stations in the UK, down from 37,539 in 1970. If this trend continues, Nissan suggests there will be 7,900 charging points by August 2020, exceeding the predicted 7,870 petrol stations.

According to Go Ultra Low, the joint government and car industry campaign, more than 115 electric cars were registered every day in the first quarter of 2016, equivalent to one every 13 minutes.

Edward Jones, EV Manager, Nissan Motor (GB) Ltd, said; “As electric vehicle sales take off, the charging infrastructure is keeping pace and paving the way for convenient all-electric driving. Combine that with constant improvements in our battery performance and we believe the tipping point for mass EV uptake is upon us.

“As with similar breakthrough technologies, the adoption of electric vehicles should follow an ‘S-curve’ of demand. A gradual uptake from early adopters accelerates to a groundswell of consumers buying electric vehicles just as they would any other powertrain.”

Nissan has been a strong advocate of supporting a convenient charging infrastructure – even so far as to partner with Ecotricity last year, calling on the UK government to introduce official EV charging point road signage.

Whilst the vast majority of electric vehicle owners charge at home, 98% of UK motorway services now have charging stations.

Nissan recently announced the joint development of an atomic analysis methodology that uses amorphous silicon monoxide (SiO) to increase the energy density of its lithium-ion batteries. This development alone could the increase driving range of its future electric vehicles by 150%.

Nissan believes these technologies, run in tandem with all-electric vehicles, will play an increasingly important role in helping major cities like London reduce harmful emissions.